With the new movie crazes about superheroes and all of our favorite comic book characters coming to life on the big screen, I’m surprised that I haven’t even broached the thought of writing a blog about comics and graphic novels! Comic books and their graphic novel counterparts have built their ranks with amazing writers such as Chris Claremont, Frank Miller, Jeph Loeb and so many more powerhouse writers. Today, my friends, is the fateful day that we take a look at the writing (and not just the “Bam, Pow’s”) that goes into cultivating and fostering the continuous stories that comprise comics.

If you have never done any collaborative work with other authors, then this may not be the right avenue that you should take with your writing. When you work on comic books, essentially every story that you write would play off of previous stories and character constrictions, which lots of writers without collaborative experience can’t seem to handle. You don’t get to make up an original character most of the time, but that doesn’t mean that you can’t make the character originally your own. Because I love Batman, I will use him as an example. Before the Frank Miller comics were instituted into the timeline, Batman comics were campy and much less dark. After his Dark Knight arc, Batman became the much more brooding and noir character we know him for today. Miller, of course, was limited by the confines of the previous writers and the intent of Bob Kane, the man who created Batman. In a field that has tried many different types of stories, you have to be unique and creative about your approach to writing a story arc in order to save yourself from obscurity.

Another thing that you will have to worry about is dialogue. Because of the nature of the panels that form comics and graphic novels, you have very little space to write lots of dialogue and even less narration. There is no setting up a scene with description. You have to rely heavily on the artist that you work with. Unless you can draw well enough yourself, you have yet another collaboration with the person designated to illustrate your work. I have heard that this can sometimes be a very strenuous partnership since the author and illustrator both have creative interpretations for how the character should look or react in any given panel, causing dissention. You have to find the equilibrium of writing to art in order to make it look organic.

Last thing that you need to be wary of is the concise nature of comics and graphic novels. Most comic book story arcs are collected to make a graphic novel that consist of about eighty to one hundred pages. Sure the stories before affect the whole canon that comprises a character, but most of the comics written resolve stories within six to eight issues. With such a small amount of page space, most comics have to move and develop fairly quickly without having the feeling of being rushed. Even if you wrote just graphic novels, the writing would roughly translate to the length of a short story.

There are plenty of things to worry about when you are writing for a comic book serialization or just working on a comic by yourself. If you decide to write comics, you will be among the pantheon of writers that have made comic book heroes relevant throughout the ages. Since this is my last blog, I am happy that I hadn’t thought of this topic until now. I don’t think that my writing here could have ended on a better note. I hope that all your writing fares well and I will miss writing these blogs. Goodbye for now.With the new movie crazes about superheroes and all of our favorite comic book characters coming to life on the big screen, I’m surprised that I haven’t even broached the thought of writing a blog about comics and graphic novels! Comic books and their graphic novel counterparts have built their ranks with amazing writers such as Chris Claremont, Frank Miller, Jeph Loeb and so many more powerhouse writers. Today, my friends, is the fateful day that we take a look at the writing (and not just the “Bam, Pow’s”) that goes into cultivating and fostering the continuous stories that comprise comics.

If you have never done any collaborative work with other authors, then this may not be the right avenue that you should take with your writing. When you work on comic books, essentially every story that you write would play off of previous stories and character constrictions, which lots of writers without collaborative experience can’t seem to handle. You don’t get to make up an original character most of the time, but that doesn’t mean that you can’t make the character originally your own. Because I love Batman, I will use him as an example. Before the Frank Miller comics were instituted into the timeline, Batman comics were campy and much less dark. After his Dark Knight arc, Batman became the much more brooding and noir character we know him for today. Miller, of course, was limited by the confines of the previous writers and the intent of Bob Kane, the man who created Batman. In a field that has tried many different types of stories, you have to be unique and creative about your approach to writing a story arc in order to save yourself from obscurity.

Another thing that you will have to worry about is dialogue. Because of the nature of the panels that form comics and graphic novels, you have very little space to write lots of dialogue and even less narration. There is no setting up a scene with description. You have to rely heavily on the artist that you work with. Unless you can draw well enough yourself, you have yet another collaboration with the person designated to illustrate your work. I have heard that this can sometimes be a very strenuous partnership since the author and illustrator both have creative interpretations for how the character should look or react in any given panel, causing dissention. You have to find the equilibrium of writing to art in order to make it look organic.

Last thing that you need to be wary of is the concise nature of comics and graphic novels. Most comic book story arcs are collected to make a graphic novel that consist of about eighty to one hundred pages. Sure the stories before affect the whole canon that comprises a character, but most of the comics written resolve stories within six to eight issues. With such a small amount of page space, most comics have to move and develop fairly quickly without having the feeling of being rushed. Even if you wrote just graphic novels, the writing would roughly translate to the length of a short story.

There are plenty of things to worry about when you are writing for a comic book serialization or just working on a comic by yourself. If you decide to write comics, you will be among the pantheon of writers that have made comic book heroes relevant throughout the ages. Since this is my last blog, I am happy that I hadn’t thought of this topic until now. I don’t think that my writing here could have ended on a better note. I hope that all your writing fares well and I will miss writing these blogs. Goodbye for now.

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